Sport

Sports crazy South Africa

South Africa is totally mad for sports. It’s an arena where all people come together to support their teams with virtually religious fervour.

Sports allows for tempers, tears, celebration and ceremony. Most of all, in South Africa, it involves a lot of noise. Whether you’re playing it or watching it, it binds the nation in euphoric cacophony. Bring on the vuvuzelas. Bring on the dustbin lids. Bring on the passionate screams from the crowds. Adrenaline and passion literally go into overdrive when a game is on.

And there are so many different sports to follow that you’d be hard-pressed not to get sucked into following at least one of them.

Rugby is, of course, probably what the country is best known for and, if you’re already a fan, you’ll know the level of rivalry between the Springboks (South Africa), the Wallabies (Australia) and the All Blacks (New Zealand). It seriously reaches a whole other level if you’re on home turf in South Africa though, and is something you definitely shouldn’t miss. Add it to your itinerary!

Wallabies vs Springboks lineout. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

Wallabies vs Springboks lineout. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

We can’t forget cricket and the tense matches between the local Proteas and the British or Indian teams though. Or soccer, for that matter. Especially since the 2010 FIFA World Cup when South Africa built its first (and subsequent) stadium devoted to football. It well and truly put the country on the world map as a world-class sporting venue with a world-class ‘welcome’ to match, Hundreds of thousands of global visitors experienced the colour of the land and the spirit of its people during the Cup, and the locals carried the competition ‘high’ with them months, if not years, afterwards. The name Bafana Bafana, South Africa’s national squad, continues to ring loud and proud to this day, and remnants of the Fan Walk can still be seen in Cape Town.

FIFA World Cup fever. Fans watching a match armed with their vuvuzelas. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

FIFA World Cup fever. Fans watching a match armed with their vuvuzelas. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

And then there’s South Africa’s love of long distance. Athletics and endurance seem to go hand-in-hand when it comes to South African competition. Ultramarathons are well-entrenched in both South Africa’s blood and psyche. Both the gruelling 90km Comrades Marathon (raced between Durban and Pietermaritzburg) and the slightly less grueling 56km Two Oceans Marathon that winds its way around the Cape mountains, draw competitors the world over, with some returning year-on-year. To witness their stamina on the road, and get a grasp on how long and diverse the courses really are, is something best done first-hand.

Entrants stride out in the 90km Comrades Marathon. Photo credit: www.thenorthface.com

Entrants stride out in the 90km Comrades Marathon. Photo credit: www.thenorthface.com

There are tons of other sports that locals are fanatical about too: golf, horseracing, boxing, swimming, motorsports, tennis, cycling, surfing… take your pick.

But, if you prefer sport that pushes your personal limits in an extreme way, South Africa has one of the widest ranges of adventure sports you can hope to do anywhere in the world. From aerial sports like skydiving, hanggliding, paragliding, parasailing, microlighting, flying fox and bungy, to water sports like white water rafting, wakeboarding and cage diving with Great Whites or crocodiles. From land-based sports like hiking, abseiling, caving and quad biking. The list goes on.

Paragliding with Table Mountain, Cape Town, in the background. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

Paragliding with Table Mountain, Cape Town, in the background. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

Don’t wait for some big sporting event to visit South Africa though – if sports is your thing, anytime is a good time to back a team. In this country, you will always find an exciting match on the go.

Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

For more travel inspiration and the latest news and tools to plan your perfect South African holiday, join the conversation on our Australian or New Zealand Facebook page.

Sports crazy South Africa

South Africa is totally mad for sports. It’s an arena where all people come together to support their teams with virtually religious fervour.

Sports allows for tempers, tears, celebration and ceremony. Most of all, in South Africa, it involves a lot of noise. Whether you’re playing it or watching it, it binds the nation in euphoric cacophony. Bring on the vuvuzelas. Bring on the dustbin lids. Bring on the passionate screams from the crowds. Adrenaline and passion literally go into overdrive when a game is on.

And there are so many different sports to follow that you’d be hard-pressed not to get sucked into following at least one of them.

Rugby is, of course, probably what the country is best known for and, if you’re already a fan, you’ll know the level of rivalry between the Springboks (South Africa), the Wallabies (Australia) and the All Blacks (New Zealand). It seriously reaches a whole other level if you’re on home turf in South Africa though, and is something you definitely shouldn’t miss. Add it to your itinerary!

Wallabies vs Springboks lineout. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

Wallabies vs Springboks lineout. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

We can’t forget cricket and the tense matches between the local Proteas and the British or Indian teams though. Or soccer, for that matter. Especially since the 2010 FIFA World Cup when South Africa built its first (and subsequent) stadium devoted to football. It well and truly put the country on the world map as a world-class sporting venue with a world-class ‘welcome’ to match, Hundreds of thousands of global visitors experienced the colour of the land and the spirit of its people during the Cup, and the locals carried the competition ‘high’ with them months, if not years, afterwards. The name Bafana Bafana, South Africa’s national squad, continues to ring loud and proud to this day, and remnants of the Fan Walk can still be seen in Cape Town.

FIFA World Cup fever. Fans watching a match armed with their vuvuzelas. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

FIFA World Cup fever. Fans watching a match armed with their vuvuzelas. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

And then there’s South Africa’s love of long distance. Athletics and endurance seem to go hand-in-hand when it comes to South African competition. Ultramarathons are well-entrenched in both South Africa’s blood and psyche. Both the gruelling 90km Comrades Marathon (raced between Durban and Pietermaritzburg) and the slightly less grueling 56km Two Oceans Marathon that winds its way around the Cape mountains, draw competitors the world over, with some returning year-on-year. To witness their stamina on the road, and get a grasp on how long and diverse the courses really are, is something best done first-hand.

Entrants stride out in the 90km Comrades Marathon. Photo credit: www.thenorthface.com

Entrants stride out in the 90km Comrades Marathon. Photo credit: www.thenorthface.com

There are tons of other sports that locals are fanatical about too: golf, horseracing, boxing, swimming, motorsports, tennis, cycling, surfing… take your pick.

But, if you prefer sport that pushes your personal limits in an extreme way, South Africa has one of the widest ranges of adventure sports you can hope to do anywhere in the world. From aerial sports like skydiving, hanggliding, paragliding, parasailing, microlighting, flying fox and bungy, to water sports like white water rafting, wakeboarding and cage diving with Great Whites or crocodiles. From land-based sports like hiking, abseiling, caving and quad biking. The list goes on.

Paragliding with Table Mountain, Cape Town, in the background. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

Paragliding with Table Mountain, Cape Town, in the background. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

Don’t wait for some big sporting event to visit South Africa though – if sports is your thing, anytime is a good time to back a team. In this country, you will always find an exciting match on the go.

Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg. Photo credit: www.wikipedia.org

For more travel inspiration and the latest news and tools to plan your perfect South African holiday, join the conversation on our Australian or New Zealand Facebook page.

South Africa: A Hiker’s Guide to Another World

With the arrival of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, outdoor activities are a must and you can’t go past hiking in South Africa. After all, the country boasts some of the most exceptional trails in the world, and there are over 1,000 to choose from.

Taking advantage of the cooler temps, even if you’re not the fittest or most adventurous of naturalists but still crave the wild and free feeling of going on a quest, you’ll have a much better chance of conserving your energy and going that much further or higher. There is lesser risk of bumping into other people too which, let’s face it, is a huge part of the charm of taking the road less travelled (or, in some cases here, completely untravelled).

Experience the magnificent Otter Trail in South Africa. Photo credit: www.southafrica.net

Experience the magnificent Otter Trail in South Africa. Photo credit: www.southafrica.net

Picture it: just you sporting your hiking boots and backpack, trekking uncharted territory.

If that sounds a little too ‘rough’ for you though, depending on where you’re hiking, and if you’re alone or with a group, you can always hire a guide, have your gear dropped off to the next rest point, and stay in luxury cabins rather than bunk down in a cave or under the massive starry sky. It’s your pick.

One of the most appealing aspects of hiking in South Africa is the varied terrain. You’ll find awesome trails in each of the nine provinces, each of which offers magnificent scenery, challenges and surprises.

The Otter Trail along the Tsitsikamma coast is one of the most popular multi-day hikes you’ll find. Stretching from the Storms River Mouth in the East to Nature’s Valley in the West, you can expect lush forests, rugged shorelines, mountain streams and waterfalls, and fragrant fynbos. It’s 42km long and takes 5 days to complete but, while it’s strenuous, the distances aren’t too great. And you’ll have the sea mist of the Indian Ocean to refresh you the whole time as it’s always within sight.

If you enjoy coastal hiking, maybe also consider the Wild Coast of the Eastern Cape that offers similar hiking with dramatically different scenery. Think endless stretches of beach with wave-lashed rocks and intermittent forest.

Exquisite Coffee Bay on the Eastern Cape Wild Coast. Photo credit: www.en.wikipedia.org

Exquisite Coffee Bay on the Eastern Cape Wild Coast. Photo credit: www.en.wikipedia.org

Another un-missable hike in South Africa is the Amphitheatre Heritage Hike, part of a UNESCO World Heritage site. Although, aptly listed by National Geographic as one of the world’s best “grail trails”, this is one you might want to start training for! Despite being shorter than The Otter Trail (a mere 20-30 kilometres taken over 3 days), it is particularly challenging, and recommended only for seasoned hikers accompanied by a guide. It will take you to the top of the second longest waterfall in the world via ascending chain ladders!

The uKhahlamba peaks (meaning "barrier of spears in Zulu) along the Amphitheatre Heritage Hike. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

The uKhahlamba peaks (meaning “barrier of spears in Zulu) along the Amphitheatre Heritage Hike. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

And if that isn’t enough of a challenge for you, try the Amathole Trail (120km over 6 days) from Madam Dam, about 22km outside of King Williams Town to the Tyume River about 3km outside of Hogsback, an arty eco-village perfect for recovery. The landscape along this hike is so picturesque, it might even give you inspiration to write your own fictional masterpiece as it did J.R.R. Tolkien with The Lord of the Rings!

Hogsback, at the end of the Amatole Trail, transports you to another world. Photo credit: www.getaway.co.za

Hogsback, at the end of the Amatole Trail, transports you to another world. Photo credit: www.getaway.co.za

If all this sounds too strenuous though, don’t be put off. There are many gentler hikes to do too, and some that are guaranteed to heighten all of your senses. Accompanied by experienced rangers, you can join the Kruger Wilderness Trails in the iconic region bordering Mozambique and Zimbabwe for about 50km over 2.5 days. You’ll cover some of the two million hectares of grassland, acacia-studded plains, bushveld, mopaneveld and tropical riverine forest inhabited by the Big Five. Depending on where your trail takes you, you could spot hippos and crocodiles at the river (Olifants Trail), or see lions hunting on the thorn-tree savannah (Sweni Trail) and hear them roaring at night.

Feel the hairs on your neck rise as you come across the Big Five on one of the Kruger Wilderness Trails. Photo credit: www.krugerpark.co.za

No matter your experience or fitness levels, South Africa has a hiking trail for you. With registered trails in all nine provinces, facilities, information and guides standing by, you have no excuse for not getting out into the wild on foot and experiencing the beauty of South Africa first hand.

Not for the fainthearted! Photo credit: Ariadne Van Zandenbergen, www.adventure.nationalgeographic.com

Cathedral Peak in the Drakensberg… not for the fainthearted! Photo credit: Ariadne Van Zandenbergen, www.adventure.nationalgeographic.com

For more travel inspiration and the latest news and tools to plan your perfect South African holiday, join the conversation on our Australian or New Zealand Facebook page.

TRAVEL TIPS & PLANNING INFO

WHO TO CONTACT

South African National Parks
Tel: +27 (0)12 428 9111

The Hiking Organisation of South Africa
Mobile: +27 (0)83 532 5557
Email: hosavosa@gmail.com

Footprint Hiking Club Mobile:
+27 (0)82 456 7020
Email: bookings@footprint.co.za

South Africa: A Hiker’s Guide to Another World

With the arrival of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, outdoor activities are a must and you can’t go past hiking in South Africa. After all, the country boasts some of the most exceptional trails in the world, and there are over 1,000 to choose from.

Taking advantage of the cooler temps, even if you’re not the fittest or most adventurous of naturalists but still crave the wild and free feeling of going on a quest, you’ll have a much better chance of conserving your energy and going that much further or higher. There is lesser risk of bumping into other people too which, let’s face it, is a huge part of the charm of taking the road less travelled (or, in some cases here, completely untravelled).

Experience the magnificent Otter Trail in South Africa. Photo credit: www.southafrica.net

Experience the magnificent Otter Trail in South Africa. Photo credit: www.southafrica.net

Picture it: just you sporting your hiking boots and backpack, trekking uncharted territory.

If that sounds a little too ‘rough’ for you though, depending on where you’re hiking, and if you’re alone or with a group, you can always hire a guide, have your gear dropped off to the next rest point, and stay in luxury cabins rather than bunk down in a cave or under the massive starry sky. It’s your pick.

One of the most appealing aspects of hiking in South Africa is the varied terrain. You’ll find awesome trails in each of the nine provinces, each of which offers magnificent scenery, challenges and surprises.

The Otter Trail along the Tsitsikamma coast is one of the most popular multi-day hikes you’ll find. Stretching from the Storms River Mouth in the East to Nature’s Valley in the West, you can expect lush forests, rugged shorelines, mountain streams and waterfalls, and fragrant fynbos. It’s 42km long and takes 5 days to complete but, while it’s strenuous, the distances aren’t too great. And you’ll have the sea mist of the Indian Ocean to refresh you the whole time as it’s always within sight.

If you enjoy coastal hiking, maybe also consider the Wild Coast of the Eastern Cape that offers similar hiking with dramatically different scenery. Think endless stretches of beach with wave-lashed rocks and intermittent forest.

Exquisite Coffee Bay on the Eastern Cape Wild Coast. Photo credit: www.en.wikipedia.org

Exquisite Coffee Bay on the Eastern Cape Wild Coast. Photo credit: www.en.wikipedia.org

Another un-missable hike in South Africa is the Amphitheatre Heritage Hike, part of a UNESCO World Heritage site. Although, aptly listed by National Geographic as one of the world’s best “grail trails”, this is one you might want to start training for! Despite being shorter than The Otter Trail (a mere 20-30 kilometres taken over 3 days), it is particularly challenging, and recommended only for seasoned hikers accompanied by a guide. It will take you to the top of the second longest waterfall in the world via ascending chain ladders!

The uKhahlamba peaks (meaning "barrier of spears in Zulu) along the Amphitheatre Heritage Hike. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

The uKhahlamba peaks (meaning “barrier of spears in Zulu) along the Amphitheatre Heritage Hike. Photo credit: www.flickr.com

And if that isn’t enough of a challenge for you, try the Amathole Trail (120km over 6 days) from Madam Dam, about 22km outside of King Williams Town to the Tyume River about 3km outside of Hogsback, an arty eco-village perfect for recovery. The landscape along this hike is so picturesque, it might even give you inspiration to write your own fictional masterpiece as it did J.R.R. Tolkien with The Lord of the Rings!

Hogsback, at the end of the Amatole Trail, transports you to another world. Photo credit: www.getaway.co.za

Hogsback, at the end of the Amatole Trail, transports you to another world. Photo credit: www.getaway.co.za

If all this sounds too strenuous though, don’t be put off. There are many gentler hikes to do too, and some that are guaranteed to heighten all of your senses. Accompanied by experienced rangers, you can join the Kruger Wilderness Trails in the iconic region bordering Mozambique and Zimbabwe for about 50km over 2.5 days. You’ll cover some of the two million hectares of grassland, acacia-studded plains, bushveld, mopaneveld and tropical riverine forest inhabited by the Big Five. Depending on where your trail takes you, you could spot hippos and crocodiles at the river (Olifants Trail), or see lions hunting on the thorn-tree savannah (Sweni Trail) and hear them roaring at night.

Feel the hairs on your neck rise as you come across the Big Five on one of the Kruger Wilderness Trails. Photo credit: www.krugerpark.co.za

No matter your experience or fitness levels, South Africa has a hiking trail for you. With registered trails in all nine provinces, facilities, information and guides standing by, you have no excuse for not getting out into the wild on foot and experiencing the beauty of South Africa first hand.

Not for the fainthearted! Photo credit: Ariadne Van Zandenbergen, www.adventure.nationalgeographic.com

Cathedral Peak in the Drakensberg… not for the fainthearted! Photo credit: Ariadne Van Zandenbergen, www.adventure.nationalgeographic.com

For more travel inspiration and the latest news and tools to plan your perfect South African holiday, join the conversation on our Australian or New Zealand Facebook page.

TRAVEL TIPS & PLANNING INFO

WHO TO CONTACT

South African National Parks
Tel: +27 (0)12 428 9111

The Hiking Organisation of South Africa
Mobile: +27 (0)83 532 5557
Email: hosavosa@gmail.com

Footprint Hiking Club Mobile:
+27 (0)82 456 7020
Email: bookings@footprint.co.za

Golfing in South Africa for all budgets

South Africa offers a wide variety of golf courses – whatever your budget.

Even if you feel you’re unable to afford to play at South Africa’s top golf establishments such as Sun City, Fancourt and Zimbali, there are numerous more affordable courses to try out around the country. You don’t have to be a member to play at most country clubs and you’ll likely find the green fees at these establishments very reasonable by general international standards.

Fancourts_Links

Fancourt

Most establishments offer the option of only paying for nine holes if you don’t wish to pay for 18. If you don’t want to bring your clubs to South Africa, you will be able to hire a set at most courses. Multiple driving ranges are available in all of South Africa’s major cities and mini-golf establishments in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban are easily accessible and very cheap.

While Gauteng is generally considered expensive by South African standards, you can still play nine holes of golf for about R120 (AUD $12). The Linksfield Golf Club, OR Tambo International Airport, offers this sort of rate and has three different courses to choose from. Visitors are always welcome here. If you are staying in Pretoria, you’ll get good value by visiting Akasia Country Club.

Linksfield Golf Club

Linksfield Golf Club

The Metropolitan Golf Club, situated next to the Cape Town Stadium, offers 18 holes in a combination of urban and natural surroundings, at very reasonable rates. You can also hire clubs here. If you’re travelling along the Garden Route, Plettenberg Bay Country Club is one of the more affordable courses.

If you can’t afford the Durban Country Club, then consider the Kloof Country Club for a much cheaper round. Bosch Hoek Country Club, a 90-minute drive from Durban, is a nine-hole course with very forgiving fairways so you’re likely to save money on balls as well as green fees if you’re a hacker.

Travel Tips & Planing Information

Linksfield Golf Club
Tel: +27 (0)11 6405762
Email: info@linksfield.co.za

 Metropolitan Golf Club
Tel: +27 (0)21 430 6011
Email: met@mweb.co.za

Kloof Country Club
Tel: +27 (0)31 764 0555
Email: pam@kloofcc.co.za

Plettenberg Bay Country Club
Tel: +27 (0)44 533 2132
Email: pbcc@global.co.za

Akasia Country Club
Tel: +27 (0)12 542 1309

Golfing in South Africa for all budgets

South Africa offers a wide variety of golf courses – whatever your budget.

Even if you feel you’re unable to afford to play at South Africa’s top golf establishments such as Sun City, Fancourt and Zimbali, there are numerous more affordable courses to try out around the country. You don’t have to be a member to play at most country clubs and you’ll likely find the green fees at these establishments very reasonable by general international standards.

Fancourts_Links

Fancourt

Most establishments offer the option of only paying for nine holes if you don’t wish to pay for 18. If you don’t want to bring your clubs to South Africa, you will be able to hire a set at most courses. Multiple driving ranges are available in all of South Africa’s major cities and mini-golf establishments in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban are easily accessible and very cheap.

While Gauteng is generally considered expensive by South African standards, you can still play nine holes of golf for about R120 (AUD $12). The Linksfield Golf Club, OR Tambo International Airport, offers this sort of rate and has three different courses to choose from. Visitors are always welcome here. If you are staying in Pretoria, you’ll get good value by visiting Akasia Country Club.

Linksfield Golf Club

Linksfield Golf Club

The Metropolitan Golf Club, situated next to the Cape Town Stadium, offers 18 holes in a combination of urban and natural surroundings, at very reasonable rates. You can also hire clubs here. If you’re travelling along the Garden Route, Plettenberg Bay Country Club is one of the more affordable courses.

If you can’t afford the Durban Country Club, then consider the Kloof Country Club for a much cheaper round. Bosch Hoek Country Club, a 90-minute drive from Durban, is a nine-hole course with very forgiving fairways so you’re likely to save money on balls as well as green fees if you’re a hacker.

Travel Tips & Planing Information

Linksfield Golf Club
Tel: +27 (0)11 6405762
Email: info@linksfield.co.za

 Metropolitan Golf Club
Tel: +27 (0)21 430 6011
Email: met@mweb.co.za

Kloof Country Club
Tel: +27 (0)31 764 0555
Email: pam@kloofcc.co.za

Plettenberg Bay Country Club
Tel: +27 (0)44 533 2132
Email: pbcc@global.co.za

Akasia Country Club
Tel: +27 (0)12 542 1309

Surfs up in South Africa: Best surf spots

South Africa’s coastline has points and bays which provide surfers from all around the world with quality waves. We’ve narrowed down the best surf spots in South Africa to catch that perfect wave!

Jeffrey’s Bay is the surf capital of South Africa, and a top 10 rated surf spot worldwide. Located in the Eastern Cape, an hour’s drive southwest of Port Elizabeth. Commonly referred to as J-bay, it’s known in the local and international surfing community as having the perfect right-hand wave. What makes J-Bay special is that the wave runs for up to 800m, giving surfers an unbeatable ride. Its main beach, Dolphin Beach, is made for chilling, tanning, surfing and shell collecting.

Jeffrey's Bay

Jeffrey’s Bay

Durban Waves

If you’re a beginner looking to catch your first wave in Durban, don’t look past Addlington Beach for small, consistent waves guaranteed to ignite your passion for surfing!

Bay of Plenty is a consistent surf spot frequented by local and international guests. The surf is fairly consistent however, winter is the optimum time of the year for surfing this spot.

Cave Rock in Durban churns out epic waves which pick up large swells! This spot has a reef bottom; therefore only experienced surfers should apply.

Durban

Durban

Cape Town Waves

If you’re looking to catch your first wave, The Surfer’s Corner at Muizenberg is a popular learning spot. It’s a 30-minute drive from the Cape Town city centre and there are plenty of coffee shops nearby to warm up post-surf.

The Cape Peninsula which is at the northern end of Cape Town gives surfers waves all year round. This surf spot is the perfect combination of swell size and direction of the wind, making this a favourite with locals and international surfers.

Long Beach in Cape Town, located on the Atlantic side of the Southern Cape Peninsula in Kommetjie boasts the best consistent shore breaks in the Cape, after Durban. The swell is small to medium on the south east side. If you’re a strong surfer and you’re looking to ride a westerly swell, the Outer Kom will be sure to thrill!

Cape Town Surfers

Cape Town Surfers

Secret Spots

Located in-between Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, Victoria Bay or Vic Bay as it’s known to the young local surfers is a local surf spot. The shape of the bay ensures consistent waves throughout the year and is great for surfers of all levels.

If you’re an experienced surfer, Glen Beach is located five minutes away from the city centre churning out powerful, hollow waves. It’s nestled between Clifton and Camps Bay Beach and is a local favourite. This is a picturesque location with the Twelve Apostles visible from the surf.

Western Cape

Western Cape

Who to contact for surf lessons

Learn2Surf
Visit the Learn2Surf website here.
SMS hotline: +27 (0)83 414 0567
Email: info@learn2surf.co.za

Surf Emporium
Visit the Surf Emporium website here.
Muizenberg, Cape Town
Tel: +27 (0)21 788 8687
Mobile: +27 (0)82 562 8687/(0)725860905

Surfs up in South Africa: Best surf spots

South Africa’s coastline has points and bays which provide surfers from all around the world with quality waves. We’ve narrowed down the best surf spots in South Africa to catch that perfect wave!

Jeffrey’s Bay is the surf capital of South Africa, and a top 10 rated surf spot worldwide. Located in the Eastern Cape, an hour’s drive southwest of Port Elizabeth. Commonly referred to as J-bay, it’s known in the local and international surfing community as having the perfect right-hand wave. What makes J-Bay special is that the wave runs for up to 800m, giving surfers an unbeatable ride. Its main beach, Dolphin Beach, is made for chilling, tanning, surfing and shell collecting.

Jeffrey's Bay

Jeffrey’s Bay

Durban Waves

If you’re a beginner looking to catch your first wave in Durban, don’t look past Addlington Beach for small, consistent waves guaranteed to ignite your passion for surfing!

Bay of Plenty is a consistent surf spot frequented by local and international guests. The surf is fairly consistent however, winter is the optimum time of the year for surfing this spot.

Cave Rock in Durban churns out epic waves which pick up large swells! This spot has a reef bottom; therefore only experienced surfers should apply.

Durban

Durban

Cape Town Waves

If you’re looking to catch your first wave, The Surfer’s Corner at Muizenberg is a popular learning spot. It’s a 30-minute drive from the Cape Town city centre and there are plenty of coffee shops nearby to warm up post-surf.

The Cape Peninsula which is at the northern end of Cape Town gives surfers waves all year round. This surf spot is the perfect combination of swell size and direction of the wind, making this a favourite with locals and international surfers.

Long Beach in Cape Town, located on the Atlantic side of the Southern Cape Peninsula in Kommetjie boasts the best consistent shore breaks in the Cape, after Durban. The swell is small to medium on the south east side. If you’re a strong surfer and you’re looking to ride a westerly swell, the Outer Kom will be sure to thrill!

Cape Town Surfers

Cape Town Surfers

Secret Spots

Located in-between Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, Victoria Bay or Vic Bay as it’s known to the young local surfers is a local surf spot. The shape of the bay ensures consistent waves throughout the year and is great for surfers of all levels.

If you’re an experienced surfer, Glen Beach is located five minutes away from the city centre churning out powerful, hollow waves. It’s nestled between Clifton and Camps Bay Beach and is a local favourite. This is a picturesque location with the Twelve Apostles visible from the surf.

Western Cape

Western Cape

Who to contact for surf lessons

Learn2Surf
Visit the Learn2Surf website here.
SMS hotline: +27 (0)83 414 0567
Email: info@learn2surf.co.za

Surf Emporium
Visit the Surf Emporium website here.
Muizenberg, Cape Town
Tel: +27 (0)21 788 8687
Mobile: +27 (0)82 562 8687/(0)725860905

South Africa for thrill seekers

South Africa is a Mecca of adventure activities and the following activities are bound to get your pulse racing.

Abseiling in South Africa
Where: Table Mountain in Cape Town
Scare factor: World’s highest commercial abseil

Table Mountain in Cape Town is located 1000m above sea level. Scaling down this 260 million year old natural wonder of the world will get your heart racing, boasting its status as the highest commercial abseil in the world – you’ll definitely earn some bragging rights as an extreme thrill seeker!

The activity operates on a daily basis weather permitting and the total activity takes 45 minutes to an hour. This includes demonstration of the abseil, putting on the equipment, abseil and short hike to get back on top of the mountain.

If you’re a thrill seeker or looking to try something new and different, the 112m vertical descent offers breathtaking aerial views of the city of Cape Town and the surrounding beaches; definitely an activity to tick off the bucket list!

Book your abseiling adventure here.

Abseiling on Table Mountain

White River Rafting
Where: Doring River in the Western Cape
Scare factor: Not for the faint hearted

South Africa offers white water rafting expeditions involve a mix of navigating through rapids at high speed and enjoying the scenery along the calmer sections of water in-between. As you enter each powerful section of white water you’ll feel your pulse racing and sense of balance tested. Then it’s out of the power zone with a sense of accomplishment as you drift into flat water again. If you do happen to take a tumble, be happy in the knowledge that your white water tales will have more of an edge.
If you are after challenging rapids to test your skills, look no further than the Doring River, located in the Western Cape or expeditions along the Blyde River which is known for its intensity.

South Africa gets the majority of its rain during the summer months between October and April, making these months premium white water rafting periods (outside of the Western Cape, which experiences winter rain).

Book your white water rafting adventure here.

White Water Rafting

Bloukrans Bungee Bridge
Where: Tsitsikamma, Eastern Cape
Scare factor: World’s highest commercial bungee bridge

One, two, bungee! Leaping off the Bloukrans Bridge, you plunge 216 metres into the gorge below. As far as adrenalin rushes go, you don’t get much better than a Bloukrans bungee jump, which also happens to be located in one of the most scenic corners of the country.

Established in 1990, Face Adrenalin has been operating for 24 years with a 100% safety record. The 216-metre Bloukrans Bridge is the highest commercial bungee jump from a bridge in the world and attracts adventure-seekers from all over the globe. The bridge is found along the scenic Garden Route and has to count as one of the most spectacular bungee jumps in South Africa, if not the world.

If you think this activity maybe too extreme for you, in April 2010, Mohr Keet set a Guinness World Record as the oldest person to bungee jump by taking the plunge off the Bloukrans Bridge at 96 years old!

Book your bungee jump here.

South Africa for thrill seekers

South Africa is a Mecca of adventure activities and the following activities are bound to get your pulse racing.

Abseiling in South Africa
Where: Table Mountain in Cape Town
Scare factor: World’s highest commercial abseil

Table Mountain in Cape Town is located 1000m above sea level. Scaling down this 260 million year old natural wonder of the world will get your heart racing, boasting its status as the highest commercial abseil in the world – you’ll definitely earn some bragging rights as an extreme thrill seeker!

The activity operates on a daily basis weather permitting and the total activity takes 45 minutes to an hour. This includes demonstration of the abseil, putting on the equipment, abseil and short hike to get back on top of the mountain.

If you’re a thrill seeker or looking to try something new and different, the 112m vertical descent offers breathtaking aerial views of the city of Cape Town and the surrounding beaches; definitely an activity to tick off the bucket list!

Book your abseiling adventure here.

Abseiling on Table Mountain

White River Rafting
Where: Doring River in the Western Cape
Scare factor: Not for the faint hearted

South Africa offers white water rafting expeditions involve a mix of navigating through rapids at high speed and enjoying the scenery along the calmer sections of water in-between. As you enter each powerful section of white water you’ll feel your pulse racing and sense of balance tested. Then it’s out of the power zone with a sense of accomplishment as you drift into flat water again. If you do happen to take a tumble, be happy in the knowledge that your white water tales will have more of an edge.
If you are after challenging rapids to test your skills, look no further than the Doring River, located in the Western Cape or expeditions along the Blyde River which is known for its intensity.

South Africa gets the majority of its rain during the summer months between October and April, making these months premium white water rafting periods (outside of the Western Cape, which experiences winter rain).

Book your white water rafting adventure here.

White Water Rafting

Bloukrans Bungee Bridge
Where: Tsitsikamma, Eastern Cape
Scare factor: World’s highest commercial bungee bridge

One, two, bungee! Leaping off the Bloukrans Bridge, you plunge 216 metres into the gorge below. As far as adrenalin rushes go, you don’t get much better than a Bloukrans bungee jump, which also happens to be located in one of the most scenic corners of the country.

Established in 1990, Face Adrenalin has been operating for 24 years with a 100% safety record. The 216-metre Bloukrans Bridge is the highest commercial bungee jump from a bridge in the world and attracts adventure-seekers from all over the globe. The bridge is found along the scenic Garden Route and has to count as one of the most spectacular bungee jumps in South Africa, if not the world.

If you think this activity maybe too extreme for you, in April 2010, Mohr Keet set a Guinness World Record as the oldest person to bungee jump by taking the plunge off the Bloukrans Bridge at 96 years old!

Book your bungee jump here.

Experience the Passion of a Rugby Match in South Africa

There is nothing quite like the experience of watching a rugby international in South Africa.

With the Super 15 rugby competition now done-and-dusted, it’s time for rugby fans to turn our attention to the Rugby Championship – a competition which sees Argentina, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa compete for bragging rights as the best team in the Southern Hemisphere – and confidence leading up to next year’s Rugby World Cup in England.

After strong showings in the Super 15 and and a nail-biting 12-12 draw in a wet and windy ANZ Stadium, fans of both the Wallabies and All Blacks can approach the upcoming internationals with optimism. But standing between them and the trophy is a proud South African team with an amazing record in this competition.

Rugby matches in South Africa resemble street parties, with fans arriving early to have a braai (barbecue) before the match and partying well into the night after the match.  They offer travellers an amazing insight into the vibrancy of South African’s passionate and welcoming people!

The All Blacks in Johannesburg

ellisParkWhen: October 4th
Where: Ellis Park, Johannesberg

Join 60,000 screaming fans at the imposing Ellis Park to cheer on the All Blacks in ‘Jozi’.

Last year’s nine–try thriller between these two sides has been described as one of the greatest matches of the professional era, with the match referee Nigel Owens Tweeting:
“That was the greatest game of rugby I have ever had the privilege to referee. Huge credit to both teams for showing what rugby is all about’

Aside from what promises to be a cracking game, Johannesburg offers travellers a wealth of entertainment options – from spectacular dining and night-life to emotive museums which document South Africa’s freedom movement there is a heap to do in and around Johannesburg!

Find out more:

A great place to begin planning your ultimate rugby trip to Johannesburg is to check out the South African Tourism’s city pages with a wealth of information about how to make the most out of your time in this exciting and vibrant city.

The All Blacks organise official tours which take in safari visits to check out the big five, and tours of Soweto in addition to match tickets and accommodation.

NewlandseditedThe Wallabies in Cape Town

When: September 27th
Where: Newlands Stadium, Cape Town

Fresh from the Waratah’s triumph in the Super Rugby competition, Wallaby fans are on a high, and are cautiously optimistic that Australia can address South Africa’s recent dominance.

Winter in Cape Town is known as the ‘secret’ season and offers travellers a wealth of opportunities to explore.

Highlights of a winter tour to Cape Town include a trip up Table Mountain, a tour to Robben Island, and a few hours (or days) in the nearby Cape Winelands. Also, check out Boulders Beach for the amazing penguins and whale watching!

Find out more about your trip to Cape Town and surrounding areas here:

The Wallabies’ travel partner We Love Rugby has some great info on how to book your trip to watch the Wallabies in Cape Town.

 

Experience the Passion of a Rugby Match in South Africa

There is nothing quite like the experience of watching a rugby international in South Africa.

With the Super 15 rugby competition now done-and-dusted, it’s time for rugby fans to turn our attention to the Rugby Championship – a competition which sees Argentina, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa compete for bragging rights as the best team in the Southern Hemisphere – and confidence leading up to next year’s Rugby World Cup in England.

After strong showings in the Super 15 and and a nail-biting 12-12 draw in a wet and windy ANZ Stadium, fans of both the Wallabies and All Blacks can approach the upcoming internationals with optimism. But standing between them and the trophy is a proud South African team with an amazing record in this competition.

Rugby matches in South Africa resemble street parties, with fans arriving early to have a braai (barbecue) before the match and partying well into the night after the match.  They offer travellers an amazing insight into the vibrancy of South African’s passionate and welcoming people!

The All Blacks in Johannesburg

ellisParkWhen: October 4th
Where: Ellis Park, Johannesberg

Join 60,000 screaming fans at the imposing Ellis Park to cheer on the All Blacks in ‘Jozi’.

Last year’s nine–try thriller between these two sides has been described as one of the greatest matches of the professional era, with the match referee Nigel Owens Tweeting:
“That was the greatest game of rugby I have ever had the privilege to referee. Huge credit to both teams for showing what rugby is all about’

Aside from what promises to be a cracking game, Johannesburg offers travellers a wealth of entertainment options – from spectacular dining and night-life to emotive museums which document South Africa’s freedom movement there is a heap to do in and around Johannesburg!

Find out more:

A great place to begin planning your ultimate rugby trip to Johannesburg is to check out the South African Tourism’s city pages with a wealth of information about how to make the most out of your time in this exciting and vibrant city.

The All Blacks organise official tours which take in safari visits to check out the big five, and tours of Soweto in addition to match tickets and accommodation.

NewlandseditedThe Wallabies in Cape Town

When: September 27th
Where: Newlands Stadium, Cape Town

Fresh from the Waratah’s triumph in the Super Rugby competition, Wallaby fans are on a high, and are cautiously optimistic that Australia can address South Africa’s recent dominance.

Winter in Cape Town is known as the ‘secret’ season and offers travellers a wealth of opportunities to explore.

Highlights of a winter tour to Cape Town include a trip up Table Mountain, a tour to Robben Island, and a few hours (or days) in the nearby Cape Winelands. Also, check out Boulders Beach for the amazing penguins and whale watching!

Find out more about your trip to Cape Town and surrounding areas here:

The Wallabies’ travel partner We Love Rugby has some great info on how to book your trip to watch the Wallabies in Cape Town.

 

Reconsider South Africa:  The Video

 

videoFrameThe latest ad from South African Tourism highlights what makes a trip to South Africa so compelling by highlighting the authenticity and friendliness of the South African people.

Join traveller James O’Driscoll as he experiences the warmth and hospitality of his South African hosts and builds genuine connections with the people, places and experiences that make up a truly unforgettable holiday.

Reconsider South Africa: The Video

 

videoFrameThe latest ad from South African Tourism highlights what makes a trip to South Africa so compelling by highlighting the authenticity and friendliness of the South African people.

Join traveller James O’Driscoll as he experiences the warmth and hospitality of his South African hosts and builds genuine connections with the people, places and experiences that make up a truly unforgettable holiday.

Hit a six in Cape Town once the cricket wraps up

If you’ve spent an hour or two checking out the international series in South Africa, you’d know it’s been a pretty exciting tour – finely balanced after two Tests, with the Aussies hoping to finish the tour on a high with a win in Cape Town.  And if you’re looking to follow the team’s footsteps, and make sure you hit Cape Town for a six, we’ve lined up some of the top things for you to do while in the Mother City.
More →

Hit a six in Cape Town once the cricket wraps up

If you’ve spent an hour or two checking out the international series in South Africa, you’d know it’s been a pretty exciting tour – finely balanced after two Tests, with the Aussies hoping to finish the tour on a high with a win in Cape Town.  And if you’re looking to follow the team’s footsteps, and make sure you hit Cape Town for a six, we’ve lined up some of the top things for you to do while in the Mother City.
More →

The sport lover’s guide to South Africa

One of the jewels in South Africa’s cultural crown is undoubtedly its sporting prowess and prominence on the world stage. Touring sports fans will find themselves instantly immersed in a land brimming with passion and vitality.

More →

The sport lover’s guide to South Africa

One of the jewels in South Africa’s cultural crown is undoubtedly its sporting prowess and prominence on the world stage. Touring sports fans will find themselves instantly immersed in a land brimming with passion and vitality.

More →

World’s best underwater experiences

Lonely Planet has named diving with Great Whites in Gansbaai, South Africa one of the world’s best underwater experiences.

Everyone knows how the Jaws theme music goes. Diving with great white sharks is up there with base-jumping in the adrenaline top 10, and Gansbaai in the Southern Cape is the ideal place to swim with the big fish. Fortunately, there’s an aluminium cage – or for the brave, a clear plastic tube – between you and the ocean’s greatest killing machines.

Numerous companies offer dives in Gansbaai’s ‘Shark Alley’, but look for operators who invest their profits back into shark conservation.

Shark Lady: http://www.sharklady.co.za/

Shark cage diving is also great in Mossel Bay on the Garden Route.

White Shark Africa: http://www.whitesharkafrica.com/home.html

Source: news.com.au

World’s best underwater experiences

Lonely Planet has named diving with Great Whites in Gansbaai, South Africa one of the world’s best underwater experiences.

Everyone knows how the Jaws theme music goes. Diving with great white sharks is up there with base-jumping in the adrenaline top 10, and Gansbaai in the Southern Cape is the ideal place to swim with the big fish. Fortunately, there’s an aluminium cage – or for the brave, a clear plastic tube – between you and the ocean’s greatest killing machines.

Numerous companies offer dives in Gansbaai’s ‘Shark Alley’, but look for operators who invest their profits back into shark conservation.

Shark Lady: http://www.sharklady.co.za/

Shark cage diving is also great in Mossel Bay on the Garden Route.

White Shark Africa: http://www.whitesharkafrica.com/home.html

Source: news.com.au