Braai

A very South African Holiday Season

During the December holiday South Africans, similar to Australians, are lucky enough to celebrate with friends and families in the sun, admiring the beautiful landscape of their country and enjoying the great outdoors.

A big part of enjoying the silly season is food and drink. South Africans enjoy a braai during the warmer months, known to Australians as a Barbecue. Braais are social events which are casual and laid-back events similar to barbeques in Australia. Traditional meats cooked on the braai include boerewors, sosaties, kebabs, marinated chicken, pork and lamb chops, steaks, sausages of different flavours and thickness, and possibly even racks of spareribs.

Lambkebabs
Image source: SBS

braai_1 (1)
Image source: Falling for white roses

sosatie-lamb-skewers_0Image source: SBS

December 26, known to Australians as Boxing Day is known to South Africans as The Day of Goodwill and is also a public holiday. In 1994 the South African Government renamed this holiday from Boxing Day to The Day of Goodwill, cutting ties from a colonial past. Similarly, South Africans and Australians like to be out and about during this time…or enjoying the sales!

 

With almost 3,000km of coastline, South Africa has many beautiful beaches, from long, sandy stretches ideal for a sunset stroll to cosy coves where you can spend the day basking in the sun. Popular beaches locals choose to relax at during the summer season include Camps Bay and Clifton Beach in Cape Town, Santos Beach and South Beach in Durban.

9522997973_4efeef74c0_z
Image source: Camps Bay – Travel Start

Camera360_2014_4_13_065505_jpg (1)565Image source: Clifton Beach – Travel Start

Horse riding in Cape Town’s Noordhoek Beach is a must-do for free-spirited travellers who love the idea of sprinting across a wide beach without a care in the world. Whether you’re an avid equestrian or just a beginner in search of an easy entry into the sport, this is the place to become one with nature. A truly memorable experience.

slide_beachfront
Image source: Imhoff Equestrian Centre

slide3
Image source: Imhoff Equestrian Centre

We hope this week’s blog has inspired you to make the most out of the holiday season!

Happy holidays and seasons greeting from the South African Tourism Australia and New Zealand team!

A very South African Holiday Season

During the December holiday South Africans, similar to Australians, are lucky enough to celebrate with friends and families in the sun, admiring the beautiful landscape of their country and enjoying the great outdoors.

A big part of enjoying the silly season is food and drink. South Africans enjoy a braai during the warmer months, known to Australians as a Barbecue. Braais are social events which are casual and laid-back events similar to barbeques in Australia. Traditional meats cooked on the braai include boerewors, sosaties, kebabs, marinated chicken, pork and lamb chops, steaks, sausages of different flavours and thickness, and possibly even racks of spareribs.

Lambkebabs
Image source: SBS

braai_1 (1)
Image source: Falling for white roses

sosatie-lamb-skewers_0Image source: SBS

December 26, known to Australians as Boxing Day is known to South Africans as The Day of Goodwill and is also a public holiday. In 1994 the South African Government renamed this holiday from Boxing Day to The Day of Goodwill, cutting ties from a colonial past. Similarly, South Africans and Australians like to be out and about during this time…or enjoying the sales!

 

With almost 3,000km of coastline, South Africa has many beautiful beaches, from long, sandy stretches ideal for a sunset stroll to cosy coves where you can spend the day basking in the sun. Popular beaches locals choose to relax at during the summer season include Camps Bay and Clifton Beach in Cape Town, Santos Beach and South Beach in Durban.

9522997973_4efeef74c0_z
Image source: Camps Bay – Travel Start

Camera360_2014_4_13_065505_jpg (1)565Image source: Clifton Beach – Travel Start

Horse riding in Cape Town’s Noordhoek Beach is a must-do for free-spirited travellers who love the idea of sprinting across a wide beach without a care in the world. Whether you’re an avid equestrian or just a beginner in search of an easy entry into the sport, this is the place to become one with nature. A truly memorable experience.

slide_beachfront
Image source: Imhoff Equestrian Centre

slide3
Image source: Imhoff Equestrian Centre

We hope this week’s blog has inspired you to make the most out of the holiday season!

Happy holidays and seasons greeting from the South African Tourism Australia and New Zealand team!

BBQ or Braai – The difference is minimal

Whether it is laying a boerewors on the Braai or a banga on the barby, the art of outdoor cooking is ancient and has traditionally been passed on from one male to the other.

A father passing on tips on how to best clean a BBQ or a mate audaciously telling his mate how best to turn a steak, is a sacred passing of knowledge that usually goes undocumented.

The cook books that litter the shelves of a kitchen or recipes that have been passed down from your mother’s mother, have no place in this shrine of charcoal and grill plates.

There is a primal instinct that entices us to stare openly into a flickering flame, engaged in an elegant dance to avoid stray tendrils of tear inducing smoke and the sputtering of hot oil.

It is a practice that has been around since the dawn of man. Sitting around the fire regaling others with stories of the hunt and conquest, has been a staple of life in both Australia and South Africa, since their diverse and varied landscapes were formed.

The ceremony remains even if the food does not. Replacing the carcass of a mammoth or a saber tooth steak are lamb and rosemary sausages orboerewors which combine pork and lamb with coriander, nutmeg and all spice.

Our primal urges force us into a battle for the control of the tongs. Eternal questions of whether to poke the sausage or how often to turn a steak are debated in the background whether in Afrikaans, English or Zulu.

While the BBQ or Braai are no longer the domain of man, sitting around the fire, feeling the camaraderie or even giving a little advice is an event all experience and a rite of passage for future tong holders.

BBQ or Braai – The difference is minimal

Whether it is laying a boerewors on the Braai or a banga on the barby, the art of outdoor cooking is ancient and has traditionally been passed on from one male to the other.

A father passing on tips on how to best clean a BBQ or a mate audaciously telling his mate how best to turn a steak, is a sacred passing of knowledge that usually goes undocumented.

The cook books that litter the shelves of a kitchen or recipes that have been passed down from your mother’s mother, have no place in this shrine of charcoal and grill plates.

There is a primal instinct that entices us to stare openly into a flickering flame, engaged in an elegant dance to avoid stray tendrils of tear inducing smoke and the sputtering of hot oil.

It is a practice that has been around since the dawn of man. Sitting around the fire regaling others with stories of the hunt and conquest, has been a staple of life in both Australia and South Africa, since their diverse and varied landscapes were formed.

The ceremony remains even if the food does not. Replacing the carcass of a mammoth or a saber tooth steak are lamb and rosemary sausages orboerewors which combine pork and lamb with coriander, nutmeg and all spice.

Our primal urges force us into a battle for the control of the tongs. Eternal questions of whether to poke the sausage or how often to turn a steak are debated in the background whether in Afrikaans, English or Zulu.

While the BBQ or Braai are no longer the domain of man, sitting around the fire, feeling the camaraderie or even giving a little advice is an event all experience and a rite of passage for future tong holders.